SECTION 7
ACADEMIC PROCEDURES


7.1
FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULING AND DEAD WEEK/DAY POLICIES

DEAD DAY (Friday prior to Final Examination):
No required class meetings, examinations or activities may take place on the Friday immediately preceding
final exams for the fall and spring terms. At their own discretion, faculty members may hold additional
office hours or give a review session on Dead Day provided these activities are strictly optional. This day
has been created as a break from regularly scheduled and/or required academic activities to allow students
to prepare for their final examinations as they see fit.

FINAL EXAMINATIONS AND DEAD WEEK (Last Week of Classes) POLICY:
Final examinations are scheduled by the Registrar. With the exception of courses requiring a common time,
all finals will be scheduled on the basis of the day and the hour the course is offered.

In general, all final examinations will be given only during the stated final examination period and are to
appear on the Registrar’s schedule. Faculty policy adopted in January 1976 provides that no exams (final or
otherwise) may be scheduled during the week preceding final examinations week (Dead Week), with the
possible exception of laboratory exams. The scheduling by an individual faculty member of a final exam
during the week preceding final examinations week is to be avoided because it tends to hinder the students’
timely completion of other course work and interfere with the schedules of other instructors. Faculty
members should not override this policy, even if the students in the class vote to do so.

Academic activities that are explicitly disallowed by this policy include:

• Scheduling an in-class examination (final or otherwise, with the possible exception of laboratory
exams) for any course during the week preceding final exams
• Scheduling an early make-up final examination - unless the student needs to miss the regularly
scheduled final for school related business (athletics, school-related travel, etc…) and requested by
the student and approved by the instructor.
• Assigning a take-home final examination that is due during the week preceding final exams –
unless the student needs to miss the regularly scheduled final for school related business (athletics,
school-related travel, etc. ) and requested by the student and approved by the instructor.

Academic activities that are allowable during the week preceding final exams include:

• The introduction of new materials
• Laboratory finals
• Required homework
• Required in-class assignments such as quizzes or worksheets (NO EXAMS)

o Quizzes are shorter exercises that take place on a fairly regular basis (e.g. 15-30 minutes in
duration, 6-10 times a semester).
o Exams are major exercises that take place only a few times a semester (e.g. 50-120 minutes
in duration, 2-4 times a semester).

• Major course assignments such as Final Presentations or Term Projects provided the assignment
was assigned at least 4 weeks in advance or was clearly indicated in the course syllabus
(Presentations must not be scheduled in conflict with regularly scheduled courses in departments
outside of the one scheduling the presentation.)

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• Take home finals (provided they are not due prior to finals week).
• Make-up exams for students who miss a scheduled exam in the prior week due to emergency,
illness, athletic event, or other CSM sanctioned activity (provided this absence has been approved
by the Associate Dean of Students)

Note, these policies apply ONLY to undergraduate courses. Students enrolled in graduate courses,
undergraduate or graduate, are bound by policies – if any – published in the Graduate Bulletin.

Last Revision:

November 30, 2010


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7.2
COMMON EXAMINATION POLICY

A unified “Common” Exam Policy fulfills several objectives, including: improving student mastery of
learning outcomes, providing for equal assessment of all students in several sections across one course,
providing exam seating that exceeds normal classroom setup in number of seats, encouraging cross-section
coordination in teaching, allowing for more than one hour or seventy-five minutes for examination periods,
accommodating competing programmatic needs, managing limited space, reducing temptations for
academic dishonesty, providing predictable and transparent guidelines for faculty and administration, and
being respectful of the busy and demanding lives of our students.

This policy covers out-of-class exams for all undergraduate and graduate level courses with the exception
of take-home exams, as noted:

• The evening common exam period is Monday through Thursday evenings, with one exam period
each evening from 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm. Exams are limited to these 90 minutes.
• No course may request more than 4 evening common exam periods in a single semester. (Final
exams are not included as part of this limitation.)
• Generally only 100-level courses are allowed to schedule an exam on Wednesday evenings.
• Priority for limited space goes to courses (or courses bundled) with largest enrollment.

Specific classes that are exempted from this policy are graduate courses that meet the following criteria.

• Graduate courses that are numbered 6xx.
Or,
• Graduate courses that have fewer than 20 registered students. For these courses, outside-of-
normal-class-time exams should be specifically scheduled in the course syllabi that are provided to
the students at the beginning of the semester. If the exam is not scheduled in the syllabus, it should
be scheduled a minimum of three weeks in advance and be at a time that does not significantly
inconvenience any of the students registered in the class.

Any graduate course that is co-taught with an undergraduate course and schedules examinations for both
the undergraduate and graduate versions of the course at the same time is not exempted from this policy.

Student considerations:
Given the numerous scenarios and arguable disadvantages inherent to evening exams that include (a)
schedule conflicts with evening courses, (b) student commitments to important non-academic opportunities
such as intramural and intercollegiate sports and student programs, and (c) the increasing prominence of
student financial and family evening responsibilities (e.g. working on- or off-campus to subsidize the cost
of education), faculty are kindly asked to judge the rationale for an evening exam against the
aforementioned challenges.

Course conflicts:
Regularly scheduled evening courses that meet partially or completely during the time of 7:30pm – 9:00pm,
Monday through Thursday, have priority over evening exams covered by this policy. Any course that
schedules an out-of-class exam during the evening exam times assumes all responsibility for arranging
make-up exams for students who have conflicts with regularly scheduled classes including courses that are
part of the McBride Honors Program.

Scheduling common exams:
During the week immediately following pre-registration for the following regular semester, the Registrar’s
Office sends an open solicitation to Department Heads and schedulers, copying all faculty, asking if
professors would like to take advantage of the evening common exam time during the following semester.

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This call for exam requests will be accompanied by the academic calendar for the upcoming term, along
with other important dates that are normally avoided; a list of rooms used for common exams with seating
capacities and furniture type; the actual current enrollment of the future courses; and the course enrollment
of the previous parallel term for the purposes of accurately estimating total enrollment in courses, especially
those that will be receiving enrollments from new freshmen and transfer students. For fall courses with
large incoming populations (new freshmen and transfer students), the previous year’s enrollment numbers
will be used. New courses with no previous enrollment history will use actual enrollments.

Faculty who wish to utilize the common exam period have until Monday of Dead Week at 5:00pm to reply
with the following information (for the fall 2015 semester, we will work with faculty to build the common
exam schedule by early August):


Course Name(s) and Number(s)

Number and section identifiers of the specific sections that will take the common exam

Total number of students in all sections taking the common exam (or close estimate based on
previous parallel term for courses with large incoming student populations)

If faculty wish to “bundle” courses, all courses bundled together should be submitted in a single
request. For instance, if Calculus I (700 students) and Calculus II (600 students) wish to offer their
exams on the same evenings using every other seat or other sharing scheme, then they should
submit a single request, with a total number of 1300 students.

Seating preference (exam seating every other seat, or regular seating at every chair)

First, second, and third preferences for days and rooms.

This information will be collected by means of an electronic form or survey through a link provided by the
Registrar’s Office.

The Registrar’s Office then begins the process of assigning common exam time slots, beginning with the
course or bundle of courses with the largest number of students. Exams will be scheduled in the order of
the highest enrollment to the lowest. This process continues until either (a) all evening common exam seats
are full, or (b) all courses desiring the use of the evening common exam period have been scheduled,
whichever comes first. The Registrar’s Office will work diligently with departments and professors in an
attempt to minimize conflicts for students. If a conflict is recognized by the Registrar that affects a large
number of students, the Registrar may decline to schedule an exam on a particular day.

Exam conflicts:
If a student is scheduled in two exams on the same evening, the course or bundle of courses with the lower
total enrollment will be required to provide the make-ups for affected students. The Registrar’s Office will
provide a list of the students with two exams in one time slot to the professor of the course with the lower
enrollment with the reminder that make-up exams are the responsibility of that professor.

Final schedule and hard deadlines:
The initial schedule will be posted after all of the priority requests have been slotted or time slots are full.

Faculty may make “late” (arriving after the Monday of Dead Week deadline) requests. All such late
requests will be accommodated, as possible, in the order in which they are received, but only after all on-
time requests have been filled.

Under no circumstance will requests be granted to use the evening common exam period for an out-of-class
exam if requested after 5:00pm on the day before the first day of class (for the semester being scheduled).
There are two reasons for this policy. First, faculty need to make the appropriate exam arrangements with
the Registrar’s Office before the beginning of the semester. Second, syllabi for courses that utilize the
evening common exam period need to include the common exam times as part of the syllabus. This is the
only way to ensure students are aware of such non-standard class meeting times so they can make

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appropriate arrangements. Mid-semester decisions to administer exams outside of the regularly-scheduled
class time are unfair to students, and not permitted, even if all students appear to approve of the change in
schedule.

The final schedule of all out-of-class exams included under this policy will be published in the first week of
the semester. No additional out-of-class exam requests will be considered after the above stated deadline.
Faculty may not administer exams outside of regular class periods (with the exception of take-home exams)
if the exam was not listed on the final schedule.

All out-of-class exams must be noted on this final list, even if the exam is being administered in a
departmental room or other room not scheduled by the Registrar’s Office.

Policy Notes:
This out-of-class Common Exam Policy was developed during the Spring 2015 semester with the following
Exam Committee members participating:

Lara Medley

Registrar, Exam Committee Chair
Tom Boyd

Associate Provost
Brendan Casias
CSM graduate student, GSG representative and CSM alumni
Dahl Grayckowski
Associate Registrar for Operations
Gerrald Greivel
Faculty, Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics
Tyrel Jacobsen
CSM undergraduate student and USG representative
Dan Knauss

Faculty, Faculty Senate President
Ken Osgood

Faculty, Faculty Senate representative and McBride Honors Program Director
Todd Ruskell
Faculty, Department of Physics
Colin Terry

CASA Director
Richard Wendlandt
Faculty, FOCSA representative

Last Revision:

July 24, 2015

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7.3
EXAMINATION PROCTORING FOR STUDENT ATHLETES

Faculty may choose to allow student athletes on excused absences for competing at athletic events to
complete examinations while they are off campus. The following process for allowing examination
proctoring of athletes who are competing at varsity-level events has been proposed by the Faculty
Oversight Committee on Sports and Athletics, vetted by the Faculty Senate and endorsed by the Provost.

Student responsibilities:
1. Notify professor as soon as an exam is announced if you are unable to attend. This notification is in
addition to the semester or post-season email notice of missed class time that is sent from Athletic
department.
2. If professor, at his/her discretion, decides that a proctored exam on the road is permissible in place
of a makeup, notify the Associate Athletics Director (AAD) and appropriate Head Coach about it.
3. Student takes (or AAD emails) the Exam Proctoring Form to the Professor with as much
information as possible (at least first 3 lines) filled out ahead of time.

Professor responsibilities:
1. Complete and return the Exam Proctoring Form to Athletics (AAD).
2. Clearly state testing conditions (allowances and restrictions) and
3. Procedures for administering the exam on the form.
4. Prepare and deliver exams to AAD in advance of team travel. Exams should be in a sealed
envelope and clearly labeled with respect to class, section (if multiple sections exist for class), and
the student(s) taking the exam. When multiple Student-Athletes are involved, the instructor should
provide one copy of the exam for each student with the student's name written in. Each exam
should have an honor code statement for the student to sign and date.

Athletics Department responsibilities:
1. Ensure availability and appropriate number of qualified and trained proctors to administer exam(s)
on the road. Priority for proctoring: academic faculty > athletics administrative staff >> coach.
2. Log-in receipt of exam from professor.
3. Establish chain of custody protocol for delivery of exam to proctor, administering exam on the
road, receipt of exam from proctor after team returns, and return of exam to professor.
4. Return exam to Professor.
5. Survey student-athletes on proctoring procedures and effectiveness.

Proctor responsibilities:
1. Ensure absolute security and integrity of exam from time of pick-up from AAD through drop-off to
AAD after team returns.
2. Sign an agreement from the examining department (if requested) regarding the testing conditions
and procedures.
3. Provide appropriate testing environment (quiet, free from distractions or temptations, with required
computer/internet access, etc.). Administering an exam while in transit, in a hotel lobby, etc., is not
considered appropriate.
4. Safeguard, respect, and actively honor the professional and institutional commitment to education
and integrity.
5. Clearly inform student(s) of the rules (including any instructions and guidelines sent by the
professor).
6. Remind student(s) of the consequences of cheating.
7. During the exam:
a. Seat students apart. Students with the same exam must be sitting far enough apart so that
they cannot see each other’s exams. Typically, this is accomplished by seating another
student with a different exam between the two students.

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b. Have the students stash their belongings – everything, other than clothing and allowed test
implements - well away from them.
c. Be aware of and monitor resources allowed for use during the exam. If students are allowed
a notecard, it would be prudent to collect the notecards even if this was not done during the
exams administered on campus.
d. Be aware of and monitor restrictions on electronic equipment. No CORE AMS class allows
the use of a calculator and electronic devices are strictly prohibited. Today's smart phones
connect to the internet and their computational capabilities are particularly problematic and
must be monitored. They should be nowhere on or around the student. Laps or seats are
frequent hiding spots.
e. Restrict restroom visits to one student at a time.
f. The proctor should be in the testing environment at all times and maintain a presence by
scanning the room and, on occasion, walking around the room. They should be looking for
the mannerisms suggestive of academic misconduct. It is recommended that athletics staff
who wish to proctor road exams observe how exams are conducted on campus to get an
idea of best practices.
g. Strictly observe the timing and time constraints of the exam. Ideally, the road students
would take the exam at the same time as CSM students so that cross-talk is minimized.
h. Discreetly reseat a student who might be looking at a fellow student’s exam.
i. Remove any unauthorized materials as discreetly as possible.
j. If concerns arise: allow student to finish exam and talk privately with the student after the
exam. Prepare written documentation of what was observed, your response to it, and what
subsequently transpired, and pass these notes along to the instructor.
k. Take photos/movies of students during exam to show seating placement.
l. Do not try to answer student questions even if it's a point of clarification. Students should
be told to list any assumptions they make and the grading professor will take this into
account.

Last Revision:

July 16, 2014

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CSM ATHLETICS – REQUEST FOR PROCTORING OF EXAM DURING TEAM TRAVEL


Student Name(s):


Class Information:

Class Name:


Class Number:


Instructor Information:

Instructor Name:


Instructor Phone Number(s):


Instructor Email:


Instructor Office Location:


Exam Information:

Preferred Exam Proctoring Date:
, and Start Time:


(Note: due to travel and competition requirements the preferred start time may not be possible.)

Exam duration:


How do you prefer to handle clarification of test questions when needed?

Instructions for Proctor:

Materials allowed:

textbook
notes
equation sheet
calculator
computer
other (please provide details)
Other instructions:

Professor signature
Date

(Return this form to Dixie Cirillo, Assoc. Athletics Director, dcirillo@mines.edu)

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7.4
EMPLOYEE TUITION WAIVERS

Governing Policies:

Section 5.3, Faculty Handbook – Enrollment in CSM Courses

Procedure:

Colorado School of Mines employees may apply to take one 3.0 credit hour class per semester, up to a
total of 6.0 credits per academic year, and have tuition and fees waived for those courses other than a
$60 technology fee associated with course registration. Courses may be taken for credit or not-for-credit
(audit). To take classes, the employee must apply as a Non-Degree Seeking student and note the class he
or she wishes to register for on the application. Non-Degree Applications can be submitted online at the
following sites:

• Undergraduate Non-Degree: http://www.is.mines.edu/registrar/Information.htm
• Graduate Non-Degree (all students holding an undergraduate degree must apply at the Graduate
level): http://www.mines.edu/NonDegree_GS

Once the employee's Non-Degree Application has been submitted and he or she has been registered for
classes, he or she will receive a confirmation via e-mail. The employee must then complete an
Employee Tuition Waiver. The form is available at http://publicsafety.mines.edu/Faculty-Forms. The
Tuition Waiver must have all of the appropriate signatures and be submitted to the Registrar's Office for
processing.

The spouse of an employee may also take one 3.0 credit hour class per semester, up to a total of 6.0
credits per academic year, and have tuition and fees waived for those courses other than a $60
technology fee associated with course registration. Courses taken by the spouse of a CSM employee
must be taken on a not-for-credit (audit) basis. The spouse of an employee must follow the same
procedure to apply as a Non-Degree student and complete an Employee Tuition Waiver.

Dependents of eligible employees may attend CSM at a reduced tuition rate. For additional information,
refer to the Employee Benefits page on the Human Resources website, using the following link:

http://inside.mines.edu/Employee_Benefits.

All employees, spouses, and dependents using any of the benefits described above must pay the $60
technology fee associated with course registration.

Last Revision:

June 4, 2014

7-1


7.5
GUIDELINES FOR VISITING COMMITTEES

Procedure:

The following sections provide details of the procedures used to identify, schedule and host a visit of a
departmental or college visiting committee.

Purpose:
A Visiting Committee is an advisory body that is charged by the President to assess and facilitate
programmatic and operational developments within an academic unit and to report its findings to the
President. Visiting Committees are expected to:

§ Represent the frontiers of the discipline nationally and internationally, as viewed from
academia, industry and government circles;
§ Evaluate the status and progress of the academic unit with respect to peers and the state-of-the-
art in the discipline;
§ Share long-range projections relevant to the discipline, thus identifying opportunities and
possible future courses of action for the academic unit;
§ Understand the operating environment for the academic unit at Mines and within the larger
context of student and recruiter interest in the discipline, as well as in industry and government
sponsored research; and
§ Provide objective and constructive advice to the President, Provost, Vice-President for Research
and Technology Transfer, Dean, and academic unit head regarding programmatic and
operational developments within the unit.
Procedures for Nominating Visiting Committee Members:

1. The Department or College creates a recommendation list, which should include titles, complete
addresses, current email addresses, and a brief biographical statement. A typical Visiting
Committee consists of three to five external members. The Department Head, in consultation
with the Department Faculty, should construct a list of seven to ten potential Committee
members. At this time, department staff should not make commitments with potential
committee members concerning membership on a Visiting Committee.
2. The list is forwarded to the Dean and Provost, who will coordinate with the Department Head or
Dean, the Vice President for Research and Technology Transfer, and the President to select a
final visiting committee. The Visiting Committee is a Committee that reports to the President,
and as such he/she has final authority in approving Committee members.
3. Once Presidential approval of a Committee is conveyed to the Department or College, the
Department or College makes initial and informal contact with the potential Visiting Committee
members to gauge their interest in serving on the Committee. The list of those potential
members confirming their interest is forwarded to the President’s office and copied to the
Provost.
4. The President’s Office prepares and mails formal letters of invitation to the members identified
on the list (a sample letter is attached)
5. The President’s Office acknowledges all responses to the formal letter of Invitation and notifies
the Department or College.

Scheduling Visiting Committee Visits:

7-2

The Provost establishes a rotating schedule for visits by Visiting Committees. Typically, visits will
occur once every three years. Visits are scheduled through the Office of the Provost in concurrence with the
Office of the President. A schedule of upcoming visits is available through the Office of Academic Affairs.


Visit Arrangements:
Department staff coordinates all logistics for the visit. Department staff should establish the availability
of the President and the Provost prior to selecting a date by contacting the President’s office. Visiting
committees should normally be held during the months of September, October, November, January,
February, March or April. The visits are normally 1 ½ to two days in length and should include
opportunities for interaction with administration, students and faculty. Additionally, the Office of the
President will coordinate a dinner event with the Visiting Committee. The department may be asked to
schedule the travel for their visiting committee members and are responsible for preparing the
appropriate travel forms for such travel.

Visit Agenda:
The Provost and President must approve the proposed agenda, and any materials sent to the Committee
prior to these being sent. The welcome letter, approved agenda, and supplementary materials should be
sent to committee members, and copied to the President and Provost, by the department head or Dean.
The agenda for each Visit must include the following elements:

1. An initial meeting of the Committee with the President, the Provost, the Sr. Vice-President for
Research and Technology Transfer, and the College Dean, (1 hour, usually 8:00-9:00 AM, in
the Coors Boardroom). Department or College should arrange for coffee and pastries for this
meeting.

2. A dinner at the President’s home, to include the Committee, Provost, SVPRTT, College Dean,
Department Head, and if space is available, selected faculty in the department. Because of space
limitations, the Department should work with the President’s Office to determine the number of
additional faculty who may be included in the dinner invitation. The department/division should
provide the President’s Office with the names of each of the attendees, including
spouses/guests. The President’s Office will email invitations to the dinner approximately three
weeks prior to the event, with an RSVP date of one week prior. In extremely rare instances, the
Provost may host a dinner at another venue.

3. Various departmental meetings and activities, organized by the Department Head in
consultation with Program Faculty. These normally include, but are not limited to meetings with
program faculty and students.

4. An exit meeting with the President, Provost, College Dean, Sr. Vice-President for Research and
Technology Transfer (1 hour). Time should be allowed in the agenda for the committee to meet
prior to the exit visit to discuss their recommendations to the CSM administration.

5. The initial meeting and exit meeting are normally held in the Coors Board Room, which may be
reserved through the President’s Office as soon as the draft agenda is prepared. Usually lunch
boxes are provided to the committee and arranged by College or Department and include the
President, Provost and SVPRTT.

Visiting Committee Information Packet:

Members of the Visiting Committee are provided materials in the form of a Visiting Committee
Information Packet for their review prior to the visit. These materials should be provided electronically
to each committee member. Format of the Visiting Committee Information Packet is provided below.

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Please note, item 1.2 in the information packet which requires Dean and Provost’s approval. Please find
at the end of this section a sample set of questions which may be used for that item.

Visit Expenses:
The President’s Office will provide travel reimbursement as appropriate to Committee members and
financial support to cover all on-campus working meals. The Department must cover any other
expenses. For travel reimbursement, the Department should contact the President’s Office for spending
authority to be included on TA and TE forms prepared by the Department for Committee travel (Please
look at Mines’ travel policy at
http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/PoGo/Policies/FIN/FIN_Chapter5.pdf.).

Visiting Committee Reports and Institutional Response:

1. The Visiting Committee should send its report directly to the President with a copy sent to the
Executive Assistant of the President.

2. The President’s Office will distribute copies of the report to the Dean, Provost, and the
Department Head.

3. The Provost will direct the College Dean and the Department Head to draft a response to the
Visiting Committee report in a format approved by the President.

4. The Provost will work with the President to finalize the institutional response to the report.

5. The final version of the response is signed by the President and sent directly to each Committee
member by the President’s office. Copies are provided to the Provost, Dean, and Department
Head.

6. The Committee’s report and institutional response are shared with the Board of Trustees.

Last Revision:

March 9, 2015





















7-4

Date


Dear :

I am writing to invite you to serve on the Visiting Committee for our Department at the upcoming meeting
scheduled for Date.

As Colorado School of Mines evolves in the next decade this administration intends to build on the
University’s traditional strengths and shall seek new directions where appropriate in developing the programs
that will ensure Mines is a strong and respected institution.

To this end, we have instructed each of our academic degree-granting units to consult with an external
Visiting Committee, composed of experts with diverse backgrounds and interests appropriate to the missions
of that unit and the University. Visiting Committees provide the University with long-term programmatic
direction, audit department programs and operations, and, as appropriate, assist with fundraising. Committee
members are selected from nominees submitted by the academic units, the CSM Foundation, the CSM
Alumni Association, and the administration. Your invitation is the result of this process.

As a Visiting Committee member you are invited to participate in one audit visit to review progress and
future plans with respect to academic programs, research activities, and faculty and student development.
Audit visits are scheduled for approximately one and one-half days. The morning of the first day will be
devoted to formal presentations and discussions on materials distributed to the committee prior to the
meeting. During the afternoon, committee members will have opportunities to meet with faculty members
and students. On the second day, the Visiting Committee will prepare a short report to present to the
administration during an exit meeting. The formal report of the committee will be sent to me following the
visit.

Appointments to the Visiting Committee are for one term. Members of the Visiting Committee will be
reimbursed for travel costs associated with their visit to the School, unless the member’s employer is able to
cover the cost.

I understand that you have expressed an interest in serving and sincerely hope you will be able to accept this
important appointment. I hope to see you in Month.

Sincerely,



Paul C. Johnson


cc: Dean
Department Head
Provost
VPUA



Last revision:
November 9, 2016

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Departmental Visiting Committee Information Packet

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part 1 INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL
1.1
Welcome Letter (Required, provided by Department)
1.2
Critical Questions to be Considered (Required, provided by Department in consultation with
Dean and Provost)
1.3
Departmental Overview (Required, provided by Department, recommended organization
provided below)
1.3.1 Introduction
1.3.2 Report Organization
1.3.3 History of Department
1.3.4 Department Today
1.3.5 Departmental Mission and Goals
1.3.6 Faculty Workload
1.3.7 Research
1.3.8 Departmental Finances
1.4
Visit Logistics (Required, provided by Department, recommended organization provided below)
1.4.1 Visit Schedule
1.4.2 Visiting Committee Membership and Contact List
1.4.3 Campus Map

Part 2 INSTITUTIONAL OVERVIEW (All sections provided by Academic Affairs)
2.1
Institutional History (Required)
2.2
Institutional Data (Required)

Part 3 DEPARTMENTAL DATA (All sections provided by Department)
3.1
Departmental Faculty (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.1.1 Overview
3.1.2 Summary
3.1.3 CVs
3.2
Undergraduate Programs (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.2.1 Overview
3.2.2 Undergraduate Program Administration
3.2.3 Trends, Strengths, Needs, Opportunities
3.3
Graduate Programs (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.3.1 Overview
3.3.2 Graduate Program Administration
3.3.3 Trends, Strengths, Needs, Opportunities
3.4
Research Activities (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.4.1 Overview and Areas of Expertise
3.4.2 Peer-reviewed Publications
3.4.3 Funding Sources
3.4.4 Research Center Activities
3.4.5 Research Expenditure Overview: Department, Faculty and Research Centers
3.5
Peer Department Analysis (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.5.1 Section of Peer Departments
3.5.2 Faculty, Research, Students and Staff Comparisons
3.5.3 Summary
3.6
Facilities (Required)



7-2

College Visiting Committee Information Packet
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Part 1 INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL
1.1 Welcome Letter (Required, provided by College)
1.2 Critical Questions to be Considered (Required, provided by College in consultation with Provost)
1.3 College Overview (Required, provided by College, recommended organization provided below)
1.3.1 Introduction
1.3.2 Report Organization
1.3.3 History of College
1.3.4 College Today
1.3.5 College Mission and Goals
1.3.6 College Initiatives
1.3.7 Faculty Workload
1.3.8 Research
1.3.9 College Finances and Fund Raising
1.4 Visit Logistics (Required, provided by College, recommended organization provided below)
1.4.1 Visit Schedule
1.4.2 Visiting Committee Membership and Contact List
1.4.3 Campus Map

Part 2 INSTITUTIONAL OVERVIEW (All sections provided by Academic Affairs)
2.1
Institutional History (Required)
2.2
Institutional Data (Required)

Part 3 COLLEGE DEPARTAMENTAL DATA (All sections provided by College and College
Departments. Divided by Departments)
3.1
Departmental Faculty (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.1.1 Overview
3.1.2 Summary
3.1.3 CVs
3.2
Undergraduate Programs (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.2.1 Overview
3.2.2 Undergraduate Program Administration
3.2.3 Trends, Strengths, Needs, Opportunities
3.3
Graduate Programs (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.3.1 Overview
3.3.2 Graduate Program Administration
3.3.3 Trends, Strengths, Needs, Opportunities
3.4
Research Activities (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.4.1 Overview and Areas of Expertise
3.4.2 Peer-reviewed Publications
3.4.3 Funding Sources
3.4.4 Research Center Activities
3.4.5 Research Expenditure Overview: Department, Faculty and Research Centers
3.5
Peer Department Analysis (Required, recommended organization provided below)
3.5.1 Section of Peer Departments
3.5.2 Faculty, Research, Students and Staff Comparisons
3.5.3 Summary
3.6
Facilities (Required)


Department or College Visiting Committee Checklist

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o Department or College constructs a list of seven to ten potential Committee Members, which
should include titles, complete addresses, current email addresses and a brief biographical
statement. Do not make commitments with potential committee members yet (Approximately six
months before the visit).
o Forward list to the Dean and Provost.
o The Provost will coordinate with the Dean, the President, the Sr. Vice President for Research
Technology Transfer (VPRTT), and Department Head to select a final Visiting Committee.
o When the Presidential approval of a Committee is conveyed to the Department. The Department
Head or Dean will make initial and informal contact with the potential Visiting Committee
members to gauge their interest in serving on the Committee.
o Interested potential members of the Committee list should be forwarded to the President’s office
and copied to the Provost.
o The President’s Office prepares and mails formal letters of invitation to the members identified
on the list (a sample letter is attached).
o The President’s Office acknowledges all responses to the formal letter of Invitation and notifies
the Department or College.
o The Department or College should establish the availability of the President and the Provost prior
to selecting a date for the visit. They can do this by contacting the President’s Executive
Assistant.
o Department or College coordinates all logistics for the visit.
§ Visiting Committee Members’ travel arrangements (please look at Mines’ travel policies at:
http://inside.mines.edu/UserFiles/File/PoGo/Policies/ACD/PM_Section10.pdf).
§ Lodging reservations and transportation.
§ Food arrangements if necessary.
§ Conference or boardroom reservations.
o Department or College prepares an agenda which needs to be approved by the Provost and
President’s Office. When ready please forward it to them.
o Department or College Prepares Visiting Committee Information Packet (Eight weeks before the
visit).
o Academic Affairs provides Part 2 of the Information Packet (Eight weeks before the visit).
o Department or College delivers Information Packet for review to the Dean or the Provost
appropriately. (Four weeks before the visit).
o The Dean and Provost provide collective feedback to the Department or College and works with
them to submit a final copy to the President (Two weeks and a half before the visit).
o After presidential approval of the Packet, the Provost returns approved Packet to the Dean or
Department Head so it can be forwarded to the President, Provost, VPRTT and the Visiting
Committee Members (Two weeks before the visit).
o After the visit, the Committee will send its report directly to the President and his Executive
Assistant , and his office will provide copies of it to the Dean, Provost, and the Department Head.

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o The Provost will direct the College Dean and the Department Head to draft a response to the
Visiting Committee report in a format approved by the President (After the Visit).
o The Provost will work with the President to finalize the institutional response to the report.
o The final version of the response is signed by the President and sent directly to each Committee
member. Copies are provided to the Provost, Dean and Department Head.
o The Committee’s report and institutional response are shared with the Board of Trustees.


Sample Set of Questions for Item 1.2

1. Overall, what are XXXX’s strengths? (e.g., students, faculty, leadership, reputation, aspirations,
organization, education, scope of research, impact on the field, etc.)?
2. Are there any areas in which XXXX is truly exemplary relative to other universities?
3. Overall, what are the key opportunities for improvement and investment, particularly with respect
to student preparation/success, research impact, faculty development, and reputation?
4. Overall, what metrics should XXXX focus on when tracking their progress?
5. XXXX was only formed a few years ago – have benefits from the college structure emerged or
are the programs largely self-isolated? Do you see opportunities that are being missed and could
be realized with the college structure?
6. What opportunities are there for XXXX undergraduate programs to be distinct and differentiated
from similarly-named programs at other institutions?
7. What opportunities are there for XXXX graduate programs to be distinct and differentiated from
similarly-named programs at other institutions? What opportunities are there for the graduate
programs to be more self-sufficient financially?
8. Relative to other top programs, how does our instructional delivery compare?
9. Relative to other top programs, how does our external engagement compare?
10. Relative to top programs, how productive are the XXXX programs in areas of education and
research? How familiar and aligned are they with Mines’ strategic plan?
11. Relative to top programs, how would you assess the engagement of XXXX faculty and students
in evolution of the programs?
12. What opportunities are there for XXXX research programs to be distinct and more impactful? Do
you consider the efforts to be largely isolated or collaborative?

Last Revision:

October 2, 2017


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