En Route to Mines@150

Campus
Paul C. Johnson, President and Professor
Conference 2016

Outline
•  Reflection (AY 15-16)
•  Metrics Snapshots
•  Higher Education Landscape
•  Strategic Plan (Mines@150)
•  2016-17 Initiatives




AY15-16 Reflection
•  Campus Make-over
(CCAC, Starzer Welcome Center, Student Center, GRL Annex,
Meyer Hall/CoorsTek, traffic changes…)
•  Accolades & Recognition
(academics and athletics, professional growth, innovation)
•  Regrouping and Realigning
(P&T expectations, alumni association, workload, business
practices)
•  Recommitment to Teaching & Learning
(Trefny Innovative Instruction Center)




AY15-16 Reflection
•  Resiliency Tests
(GRL vandalism, litigation, campus moves, economy)
•  Taking a Hard Look in the Mirror
(Title IX)
•  Eat, Talk, Travel, Figuring Out #17
(aspirations, values, interests, opportunities, priorities, barriers)
•  What’s Your Vision?
(strategic plan(s), new initiatives, student numbers?)
•  Parking, Holidays, and Snow Days J


Shared Values
Hard Work • Academic Rigor • Excellence •
Challenges • Resiliency • Teamwork
Community • Location • Size • Students
History • Traditions • Accolades • Student-
centric • Differentiated Mission • Connections
Creativity • Compassion • Innovation •
Impact • Teaching • Leading
Core Values • Aspirations
Higher Calling/Purpose • Balance • Fun •
• Priorities • Initiatives
Recognition • Diversity • Inclusion • Access





Mines Snapshot and Trends
7000"
30%&
27.8%& 28.0%&
Graduate"
Undergraduate"
Women&
Hispanic&
26.0%& 26.5%& 27.1%& 26.6%&
25.1%& 25.2%&
6000"
5672% 5794% 5580%
23.9%&
5405% 5468%
25%&
5219%
21.8%& 21.8%&
4927%
5000"
4688%
4327%
1290% 1261% 1020%
20%&
1343% 1269%
3849% 3979% 4151%
4000" 3581%
1085% 1222% 1343%
751%
770%
851%
935%
15%&
738%
3000"
10%&
7.5%&
7.7%&
7.6%&
8.0%&
7.6%&
2000"
6.3%&
6.4%&
6.6%&
6.5%&
6.9%&
5%&
1000"
2843% 3098% 3209% 3300% 3392% 3603% 3705% 3876% 4062% 4199% 4382% 4533% 4560%
0"
0%&
004" 005" 006" 007" 008" 009" 010" 011" 012" 013" 014" 015" 016"
006& 007& 008& 009& 010& 011& 012& 013& 014& 015& 016&
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
F2
UG Apps/Yield/Quality: Strong/OK/High
Little change in diversity recently;
Graduate Student Numbers?
Dissimilar to CO HS graduation demographics
Design Constraints (housing, classrooms, other)?
(51.5% women; 26.4% Hispanic)

Mines Snapshot and Trends
180$
Access to a Mines Education?
PELL$ELIGIBLE(STUDENTS(IN(FRESHMAN(CLASS(
160$
148$
Only about 11% of AY2016-17
138$
134$
140$
140$
freshmen are Pell grant recipients
120$
107$
112$
Correlation with tuition increases ?
100$
Factors (recruitment and financial
80$
aid, projecting Mines)?
60$
Our goal is a student population with
40$
demographics that mirror Colorado’s
20$
high school graduates
0$
F2011$
F2012$
F2013$
F2014$
F2015$
F2016$

Mines Snapshot and Trends
Mines’ Investment in People to Enable
Student Success and Research Growth
(2010 – 2016, with student enrollment +14%)
Tenured/Tenure-Track: 205 (+11% from 2010)
Teaching Faculty: 79 (+66% from 2010)
Adjunct Faculty: 131 (+35% from 2010)
Staff, Advisors, etc.: 576 (+23% from 2010)

Mines Snapshot and Trends
Freshman)Cohort)Reten.on)to)2nd)Year)
100.0%$
Significant Improvements
90.0%$
over 10 year period
80.0%$
Overall, strong retention
for a STEM-focused
70.0%$
institution
60.0%$
2005$
2006$
2007$
2008$
2009$
2010$
2011$
2012$
2013$
2014$
Focused efforts to improve
Al $Freshman$ 87.0%$ 84.0%$ 85.0%$ 90.0%$ 88.0%$ 89.0%$ 89.3%$ 91.9%$ 93.7%$ 94.1%$
retention in some groups
Female$
83.0%$ 85.0%$ 88.0%$ 94.0%$ 91.0%$ 91.0%$ 90.0%$ 95.2%$ 95.2%$ 95.0%$
URM$
84.0%$ 84.0%$ 88.0%$ 92.0%$ 89.0%$
85.0%$ 91.3%$ 93.0%$ 92.3%$
(e.g., “Nucleus” First-
Hispanic$
81.0%$ 84.0%$ 87.0%$ 96.0%$ 91.0%$ 88.0%$ 81.0%$ 89.4%$ 91.0%$ 88.9%$
Generation Community)
Pell$
90.9%$ 82.6%$ 83.7%$ 84.8%$ 93.2%$ 93.3%$ 89.3%$

Mines Snapshot and Trends
Time to Graduation
4"yr%Grad%Rate%by%Freshman%Cohort%
6"yr%Grad%Rate%by%Freshman%Cohort%
70.0%$
85.0%$
Al $Students$
Female$
URM$
HIspanic$
Pell$
Al $Students$
Female$
URM$
Hispanic$
Pell$
80.0%$
60.0%$
75.0%$
50.0%$
70.0%$
40.0%$
65.0%$
30.0%$
60.0%$
55.0%$
20.0%$
50.0%$
10.0%$
45.0%$
0.0%$
40.0%$
2004$
2005$
2006$
2007$
2008$
2009$
2010$
2011$
2004$
2005$
2006$
2007$
2008$
2009$
Al $Students$
38.1%$
39.6%$
40.4%$
41.6%$
46.2%$
49.0%$
51.9%$
55.1%$
Al $Students$
64.2%$
69.4%$
66.6%$
70.1%$
75.9%$
76.5%$
Female$
45.9%$
38.5%$
47.0%$
44.6%$
52.0%$
57.5%$
58.0%$
66.4%$
Female$
69.2%$
65.8%$
70.8%$
70.8%$
79.2%$
82.8%$
URM$
29.3%$
25.9%$
36.7%$
44.2%$
41.5%$
39.8%$
50.4%$
46.0%$
URM$
58.7%$
56.0%$
70.6%$
67.3%$
77.1%$
73.7%$
HIspanic$
19.5%$
30.5%$
30.0%$
47.2%$
37.3%$
30.9%$
46.1%$
46.3%$
Hispanic$
51.2%$
54.2%$
68.0%$
66.0%$
82.4%$
72.7%$
Pell$
32.9%$
29.0%$
26.5%$
35.5%$
41.2%$
40.6%$
41.6%$
43.1%$
Pell$
59.3%$
58.0%$
58.8%$
62.6%$
74.8%$
68.8%$
(+) Impressive improvements over the past decade
(-) Not a compelling argument to attend Mines, especially to the top students in the country and
those worried about the cost of their degree and ROI
Need to eliminate institutional constraints on time to graduation

Mines Snapshot and Trends
(+) Mines tuition is lower than many
Colorado'Resident'Tui0on'&'Fees'
other STEM-focused universities (most
%$20,000%%
of which are privates)
%$18,000%%
%$16,000%%
(-) Mines tuition is higher than many
%$14,000%%
public institutions offering similar
%$12,000%%
%$10,000%%
programs
%$8,000%%
(-) The top students we recruit are
%$6,000%%
offered significantly discounted
%$4,000%%
%$2,000%%
tuition at other institutions
%$1%%
FY13%
FY14%
FY15%
FY16%
FY17%
We need to offer differentiated
T&F% $15,654%%
$16,485%%
$16,918%%
$17,353%%
$17,842%%
programs, experiences, services, and
outcomes to compete.

Mines Snapshot and Trends
Funded Research and Creative Activities & Innovation
FY16
expenditures
flat at about
$60M
Increases in IP
activity
Research Task Force Recommendations:
Differentiated workloads, internal investments linked to output and impact, research
neighborhoods, themed institutes, strategic faculty hires

Mines Snapshot and Trends
Finances:
•  State support ($20M/year) – at best
stable, could decrease due to TABOR
restrictions; SB-3 constraints
•  CSMF support ($21M/year) – expected to
be flat (economy down, donors up)
•  Gross Tuition Revenue ($130M/year) =
tuition x student numbers – modest
increases in tuition in near future
Optimize use of our existing capacity
Changes to internal budget model
Pursue alternative revenue sources

Landscape
Higher Education Landscape
Low state support – burden on students & families
Press/political focus on tuition increases and debt
Family focus on cost, debt, jobs
All face the same financial challenges - what are
others doing?
•  Large public schools?
•  Small private schools?
Need to minimize aggregate cost to degree, show
strong ROI, supplement tuition revenue





Strategic Plan(s)
+
2004 - 2014

Strategic Plan(s)
•  Cultivate world-class expertise in
key focus areas
•  Enhance the distinctive identity
•  Enhance Mines distinction as a
and reputation of Mines
research institution
•  Build upon a student-centered
•  Sharpen Mines distinction in
campus culture of excellence,
undergraduate education
inclusion, diversity, and

community
  Align graduate programs with
professional and societal needs
•  Build and diversify revenue

streams and auxiliary enterprises
  Realign the geographic,
demographic, and programmatic
•  Develop and support campus
mix of students
infrastructure and processes to

match Mines’ aspiration to
  Expand the financial resource base
become a top-tier engineering
•  Restructure the deployment of
and science institution
financial resources and capital
assets

Strategic Plan
Aspirations & Metrics
• Recognized in the Top-10 of similarly-sized peer
institutions
• 4-Year graduation rate of 60%
• 6-Year graduation rate of 85%
• >$100M (or $50M) in research expenditures
• Financially self-sustaining
• $10M or (>$2M) in professional education revenue
• Endowment >$250M
• 95% of graduates (all) report that they would have
chosen Mines again

Strategic Plan
Reflection
• Re-commit to being “student-centric” and “Mines-centric”
• Focus on being “exceptional” (= excellence + distinction) in all
areas
• Reset aspirations, metrics, and expectations for ourselves in all
areas, with consideration of best-in-class performance of peer
institutions
• Add new metrics related to core values (e.g., access)
• Need a university design, with principles to guide new investment,
divestment, and optimization of resources to maximize student
success, scope and impact of research enterprise, and achieving
aspirational metrics

Strategic Plan
Near-Term Initiatives:
¨ 
Exceptional programs for exceptional students (stress professional preparation and
longer-term career horizons)
¨ 
Accessible education (reduce time and cost to degree completion)
¨ 
Social research culture (thematic neighborhoods/institutes, GC problems)
¨ 
Compelling communications (recruitment, reputation, resources)
¨ 
Redesign administrative structures and processes to support institutional priorities
¨ 
Entrepreneurial efforts (students, staff, faculty)
¨ 
Professional development (people, leaders)
$1M Innovation Fund
for 2016-17
¨ 
Diversify resources and optimize use of existing capacity
¨ 
Recognition and Rewards